Inequality, poverty and living standards

The distribution of income, consumption and wealth continues to be a central area of IFS research. Amongst the many aspects of our work in this area, we seek to chart, explain, and understand changes in inequality in wages, earnings, incomes and consumption, in the UK and other countries; we also seek to examine the effectiveness of a wide range of policies aimed at reducing poverty - including taxes and benefits, and other types of policy interventions

Our research is also concerned with the welfare implications of changes both to inequality and poverty. These depend on how far they are caused by permanent changes in the relative standings of individuals in the income distribution (e.g. a change in the return to certain skills caused by technical progress) or by changes in the frequency of short-lived events (e.g. temporary layoffs), as well as the availability to individuals of specific insurance and other mechanisms to mitigate unexpected events.

To get an idea of where you fit into the income distribution, try our Where do you fit in?, which will plot your position on the distributional graph. You can also download a spreadsheet containing some key figures about inequality.

Intergenerational Fariness Bulletin - Retirement (from the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries)

| External publications

Andrew Hood contributed an article to this bulletin titled 'The changing generosity of private pension provision and its differential effects across generations'

Find out more

Minimum wages in the next parliament

| Briefing Note

This briefing note, released as part of the IFS's pre-election analysis, provides key information about minimum wages in the next parliament.

Find out more

Incomes and inequality: the last decade and the next parliament

| Briefing Note

This note has been written in the run-up to the 2017 general election. IFS Election 2017 analysis is being produced with funding from the Nuffield Foundation as part of its work to ensure public debate in the run-up to the general election is informed by independent and rigorous evidence.

Find out more