Our goal at the Institute for Fiscal Studies is to promote effective economic and social policies by better understanding how policies affect individuals, families, businesses and the government's finances.

Proposed minimum unit price for alcohol would lead to large price rises

The Scottish Government plans to introduce a minimum unit price for alcohol on 1 May 2018. Meanwhile, the Welsh National Assembly is also considering introducing such a policy. In a new briefing note, we provide evidence on the likely impact of this type of reform and find that it will likely represent a big intervention.

Find out more
Alt Image

Quality, not quantity, is what matters

Luke Sibieta, research fellow at the Institute for Fiscal Studies, takes a look at the impact of the apprenticeship levy so far since its introduction in May and argues that one million high-quality apprenticeships might well be better than three million lower quality ones.

Find out more

Auto-enrolment has changed the pensions landscape but big questions still remain

In an article in today's Times, IFS director Paul Johnson examines the issues surrounding pensions auto-enrolment.

Find out more

Does leaving education in a recession have a lasting impact on living standards?

A new report, published today by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) and funded by the Nuffield Foundation, shows that leaving education when the economy is weak can have lasting effects on your pay and employment – even once the wider economy has returned to normal. However, young adults’ own pay and employment are not all that matters for their living standards: both the tax and benefit system and parental incomes can cushion the blow for many.

Find out more

If we’re serious about helping young buyers, hard choices lie ahead

In an article in today's Times, IFS director Paul Johnson examines the impact of the housing measures proposed in the Autumn Budget.

Find out more

It may just sound like a statistic, but productivity growth matters for all of us

Productivity measures how much, on average, workers in the UK produce per hour worked. Ultimately, improvements in living standards arise as a result of productivity increases – slower productivity growth means wages will grow more slowly. It is this effect on wage growth that means lower productivity is bad news for the Chancellor (as this means lower tax revenues) but it is also why the downgrade announced on Budget day was bad news for all of us.

Find out more

Autumn Budget 2017

A summary of our analysis, recordings and slides from the IFS Budget briefing, held on Thursday 23 November, can be found on our Budget 2017 page. You can also see a range of IFS analysis and comment, including explainer videos and background charts, relating to the Autumn Budget 2017.

Find out more